Measures That Can Be Taken if You Get a Tick Bite


The recommended measures may vary depending on who it is you are talking to. This post outlines the ones that I most often recommend.


Remove the tick. Grasp it by the head and pull straight out. Do NOT twist the body, or you run the risk of breaking off the head which may remain embedded. It is best to avoid unnecessary trauma to the tick from measures such as burning it, suffocating it, applying things like essential oils to it, or squeezing it. This may increase the chances of digestive juices from the tick being forced into your bloodstream.


If you have the tick, save the tick and send it in for testing. In New England ticks can be sent into UMO (University of Maine Orono) or to UMASS (University of Massachusetts). I lean towards UMASS for testing, because they test for more of the co-infections than UMO does. You will need to pay out of pocket for these tests, but they are invaluable in providing you information with the microbes you may be looking at, especially since most of the mainstream testing for co-infections that is available is incredibly insufficient. *


Clean the bite area.


After the bite is clean there are different things you can do. The one I recommend is to cover the site of the bite with a salve or ointment that has anti microbial properties, like Neosporin. Then cover this with a bandaid. The idea is to keep the bite site moist which will prevent it from healing over. This allows some of the toxins that may be in there to come out.

Some people recommend a poultice made from Andrographis powder that can be used alone or combined with a drawing clay. They both have the same idea, drawing out toxins.


The next measures I recommend are to take detoxing baths daily for at least one week, in a bath that contains 6 cups of Epsom salts and 1 pint of hydrogen peroxide. This should be done in as hot of water temperature as you can tolerate, making sure the site of the bit is submerged.


I recommend a supportive immune system herb, such as astragalus be brought in to the routine. This is an apoptogenic herb that will neither stimulate or suppress the immune system. Homepathic Ledum may also be used. I would recommend 200C, but 30C, which is what most health food stores carry, would suffice. Flower Essences at this time are not recommended.


Then wait. If symptoms arise, make choices based on the path you would like to follow. The most common paths are antibiotic therapy, herbal therapy, flower essence therapy or homeopathy. I will discuss this subject in greater depth in another blog post.


If you get a bull’s eye rash, this is confirmation that it is borrelia, Lyme Disease. This is not confirmation for any of the 19 known co-infections that can transmitted by ticks and often

accompany Lyme.


Please stay tuned for my other blog posts and videos that are coming this month on the various aspects of this broad topic.


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*Upon researching the webite for UMASS testing, I discovered that they have paused on testing as of December 2020, and it appears they have not restarted. They have a list of other labs that do testing on their website. Unfortunately I do not see that any of them test for as many microbes as UMASS does.

https://www.mass.gov/service-details/tick-identification-and-testing-services


UMO Testing

https://extension.umaine.edu/ticks/submit/


Tick Check in PA

https://www.tickcheck.com/landing/lyme-disease?gclid=CjwKCAjwgZuDBhBTEiwAXNofRF9uS29gdr9TysyEA7N_aIQgMk8TSJhMOvQcRg6UBCfYoblwG1mWhRoCms0QAvD_BwE


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